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Please understand us while we work on your Hair Style

Please Understand Us While We Work

We get it all the time. And we are just doing our job. We are working and going to school when we get to The United States of America. When we communicate with those we work with many are unable to speak English well . When we laugh and talk many times one of us can’t speak anything English except words that are directly dealing with the job we may be working.
It is quite a revelation to one’s thoughts to find there is just a lack of true understanding when people arrive in the United States from elsewhere . Readers we are talking about people that lived thousands of mile away on the other side of the world. These people (African) have already learned 2-3 different languages by the time they are 8. Now many of them arrive in America with only a mind to make a living and to learn what American culture is about. We want to taste this milk and honey. We have read about it and we have seen it on television.
To tell you the truth I now see that America is a place of many cultures and languages. There are grocery stores that maybe 88% of its customers are foreign. They just will not shop at the grocery stores every American shops in. They have certain tastes that only these certain stores provide. Also many Americans just do not know anything about some of the shopping places foreigners frequent. There are many things that we must think about. We have a certain gift that we have that makes us unique on what we do. Many people can do it if they were to practice constantly. But we are practicing and living this thing so today we service you in what we know to do. Just as many Asian people do nails, there are few cultures that do nails for a living in the United States.

Many times we tend to find fault in anything that we might think of we might do better than someone else. If we are into a business affiliated with people that do things similar for another company or people we know or we do ourselves, we always have advice or some type of burning sensation inside of us that brings forth fault in others. Or just a strong urge that makes us have a very strong opinion about what someone else is doing.
For some reason people always talk about foreigners are over here taking over. These sayings have a certain weight on one’s heart with a certain urge that plain Ole wants to stop anyone that was not born in America to not be able to grow. We listen to news and many conversations that sway a person’s thinking to the point that hate is in the heart.
Can we work the way we work and do a great job is all I ask. I want to let God judge the world. I want to work and help people get to where they need to be and survive. Yes I believe learning English is a must especially to those of us planning to make a life here in this Great country the United States of America. Something we would like to do is not annoy anyone when we speak a language given to us by our ancestors. We are working late many times and we are very tired many times. As we get tired as we need energy to move and we try to keep ourselves busy by talking and having fun.
When we have fun we are not being loud as we can. Nor do we bend over to get close to a customers ear so that we may perceive to be super loud. We have a culture that we do things different from other cultures. There are no two cultures the same on earth. I want to be allowed to live freely without breaking the law. We are working very hard to get your hair the way you want it. We are cleaning to make you feel relaxed and not afraid to sit back in chairs. And we play spiritual music to keep peace on the atmosphere. Once we all learn English we will then be able to hold a conversation with all customers. No person on earth can be a robot nor can people come in for a service and make an environment not healthy. We are here to do what you need but we must communicate with each other because we feed off of each other for energy. We also know that sitting for more than 4 hours can be irritation in itself. But do know that time is a part of your blossoming beauty my lovely ladies.
Understanding us as we understand you should not be not so fun. Maybe we all should try to allow people to live and as long as we are not hurting anyone or invading anyone’s space life can be fun and understood while we work. Thank you all for listening and reading. We ask that you all please support us because we love what we do. Do not nail us to the cross because we have an answer that does not live up to your standards. Let us not have such a short fuse. We come in peace my sisters.
It is time to just live with everybody in harmony. It is very sad that there are those certain someones out to destroy others for no reason. Ladies we are welcoming you with open arms, so ask questions and think of more things to ask. We only want you to feel comfortable with us. We need your business. We are here to give you a service to remember. Thanks .

Sincerely
Diamond



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African Diamond Braids

African Hair Braiding in this day and age is clearly fashion.  The beauty of a woman’s crown with braids and twists bring such a rush to my heart. Every Twist and every Braid that I see on a young lady or woman brings  a warmth to my heart. The beauty of a braid to my eyes brings happiness to me. When we work on a client in our shop we feel special because we know that heritage  is upon their heads. It is something that cannot be explained when a customer comes into our shop. We welcome you with open arms.  We want only the best for you and we want you to repeat as a client. So we care for you to bring about a feeling that you may  like coming back. A beautiful set of  Senegalese Twist can do  wonderous things for you. Once you get work done to your head a new look that is all about beauty  comes to your face and to your heart. The heart and soul of a client that patronizes this shop has many benefits.  Self esteem  immediately becomes a strong point in our clients aura. Once you are able to love the beauty you have by loving who you are down deep on the inside. When you find that new you we know that you will help us find new people just like you to help with the love of oneself. The learning of  your true self can be found inside you and inside of you. We ask you to share what we are about with your friends and family . We want to be your hairstylists.  We want best friends with your hair. We want you to get African Hair Braiding styles with  and feel like you want to come back again and again. Thanks for spending time with us.

Sincerely

Diamond

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History of African Hair Braiding

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#africandiamondbraids,#senegalesetwists,#africanhairbraiding,Africanhairbraidingsalons,

Senegalese Twists

African hair sculpture is what they call it in Africa and to them it is an art. Africans hardly ever leave their hair or their body plain it is all about “natural” state. Africans spend lots of time and energy on grooming and self-admiration. Sounds like it’s the same way there as it is here because I love to “groom.” Ha ha. Even looking at youth today in the African-American community they express themselves just as they feel. Anyway, Africans did spend a lot of time on their hair and looks but special attention to their hair. The “art” of hairdressing was practiced mostly for women and male hairdressers can hardly be found. The skill of hairdressing has been handed down from generation to generation and requires artistry, manual dexterity, and patience because many of their styles are elaborate and time-consuming. For most African women hair is a medium for creative self-expression.
Now their hair is styled for many different reasons. In some parts of Africa, hairstyles help to determine age, in others ceremonial occasions are marked by special styles. The design and construction of hair depends on different factors, some hair styles may need sisal, clay, the bark of trees, or cloth pads; in other cases it could involve intricate knitting, braiding, and threading of the hair. The most complex styles can take up to several hours and sometimes even days. That’s true here also and we got it from them. The slave master’s wife’s would watch the women braid the kids and each other’s hair and would want their hair to be the same as theirs because the styles were so beautiful. Anyway, they found that you could find complex styles only in the interior of the continent where people still live “primitive” and they have time for all that stuff. In urban areas, the styles are simpler where they have adopted western styles.
OK, if you draw a line running from Dakar, Senegal in the west and to Khartoum, Sudan in the east you will see that to the north of the line live the light-skinned, straight-haired Hamites and Semites of North Africa. These would have been the so called “house slaves” or could even be passed of as being white in some cases. Around the dividing line, the people would have been brown-skinned and would have had curly hair because of Semite or Hamite intermixtures. They were in the middle of everything, they were not house slaves and not in the field just there, but doing work nonetheless. South of the line live the dark-skinned, kinky-haired members of the black race. Each region has it’s own traditional styles, and each group of people has it’s own code of aesthetics, which distinguishes it among the multitude of ethnic groups in Africa.
Hieroglyphs and sculptures illustrate the attention Africans have paid to their hair for thousands of years. Some of the earliest Nok and Benin busts from Nigeria show intricate hairstyles. Men and women from all levels of society wore their hair to indicate their place of birth, material status, occupation and wealth. Religious vows, significant events, and symbols could be represented in braid work. In addition to creating a great do, the stylist also transmitted cultural values.
Flamboyant hair sculptures are in the evidence today in African cultural groups. Women from diverse areas of the continent have a common technique of wrapping a section of hair with thick thread from the scalp to the hair ends, which can be made to stand up straight or can be worn down, framing the face. The wrapped sections of hair can be coiled and attached to each other with more thread, yielding very intricate creations suited for special occasions.
Stylistic considerations have become blurred across the boundaries of geography, ethnicity, gender, and time, but contemporary African-inspired hairstyles continue to demonstrate techniques and aesthetics from ancient times. This art survived the middle Passage, the time when slave trading was in full force. Braiding and hair wrapping have been practiced in their most basic forms for as long as there have been African-Americans, nearly five hundred years.
Little girls received their first simple pigtails or braids by their mom or their grandmother. Brushing, oiling, and braiding the hair helped it to grow. Even with the invention of the straitening comb in the early 1900s, little girls had their hair braided with bangs, barrettes, ribbons, or clothespins. Only on Sundays or special occasions did the younger girls wear their hair loose and curled with hot curlers. These hairstyles require daily maintenance unsuited to the activities and schedules of the kid or the parents. (That is exactly how it is at my house. When I was a child my mom always kept my hair braided and now my sisters hair is always braided up so it wont take extra time to get ready in the morning.)
A rebirth of cultural awareness among African-Americans, starting in the 1960s, resulted in the gradual acceptance of cornrows, which filled in for the Afro as a stylish expression of identification with the “Motherland.” The braiding technique was named for neatly planted rows of corn. Cottage industries prospered as African-American women who had been practicing met an increasing demand for the convenient and versatile coiffure. Professional stylists introduced innovations based on old techniques. Variations included extensions-synthetic or human hair woven into the hair top to give it a longer appearance and so you could wear beads. Black print media, especially Essence magazine, acted as cultural agents for the dissemination of creative new braided looks. Television helped performers such as Stevie Wonder gain renown for their elaborate cornrows as well as their artistic achievements.
Now Dreadlocks is the last thing im going to talk about. Dreadlocks are NOT new. This hairstyle is possibly as old as the existence of Africans. Sculptural renderings of some of the Egyptian pharaohs seem to indicate they had dreads in their hair. Rastafarians did not adopt the style to start a new trend; based on a Nazirite vow they have declared to never let a comb or scissors to touch their locks. While the style is sported by some of the ultimate black self-affirmation, and even some whites have successfully adopted it, general acceptance was slow coming and is just now becoming popular here in the U.S.
After reading books on my ancestors I have a deeper understanding of where I come from and that the hairstyles from back then are the same but different. They are the same because people still wrap their hair, braid it up and have dreads. It is different because they are not the same styles per say, their styles back in Africa were all about who they were. Nevertheless, I guess if they saw ours, they would wonder why they are so plain as our upbringing is who we are today in a culture we live in that is not our own. Anyway we are finding our way and teaching ourselves what we have as a culture just looking back.

Peace
Diamond

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